!!> EPUB ❂ Crooked Mirror ✽ Author Louise Steinman – Snapchatlogin.us

Crooked Mirror A Lyrical Literary Memoir That Explores The Exhilarating, Discomforting, And Ultimately Healing Process Of Polish Jewish Reconciliation Taking Place In Poland Today Although An Estimated 80 Percent Of American Jews Are Of Polish Descent, Many In The Postwar Generation And Those Born Later Know Little About Their Families Connection To Their Ancestral Home In Fact, Many Jews Continue To Think Of Poland As A Bastion Of Anti Semitism, Since Nearly The Entire Population Of Polish Jewry Was Killed In The Holocaust The Reality Is Complex Although German Occupied Poland Was The Site Of Great Persecution Towards Jews, It Was Also The Epicenter Of European Jewish Life For Centuries Louise Steinman Sets Out To Examine The Burgeoning Polish Jewish Reconciliation Movement Through The Lens Of Her Own Family S History, Joining The Ranks Of Jews Of Polish Descent Who Are Confronting Both Poland S Heroism And Occupation Afflicted Atrocities, And Who Are Seeking To Reconnect With Their Families Polish Roots

!!> EPUB ❂ Crooked Mirror  ✽ Author Louise Steinman – Snapchatlogin.us
  • ebook
  • Crooked Mirror
  • Louise Steinman
  • 07 October 2018
  • 9781306908894

    10 thoughts on “!!> EPUB ❂ Crooked Mirror ✽ Author Louise Steinman – Snapchatlogin.us


  1. says:

    Louise Steinman s The Crooked Mirror A Memoir of Polish Jewish Reconciliation has been praised as appealing to wide audiences, and unblinking, scrupulous and enduring Richard Rodriguez called Crooked Mirror the most extraordinary travel book I have ever read about a nightmare country, dark, haunted Poland, into which miracle working Steinman breaks shattering light In fact The Crooked Mirror is the self indulgent, impressionistic travel diary of a New Age, dilettante Holocaust tourist The book consists of brief, unorganized anecdotes In one, a Lakota healer burns sweet grass and waves an eagle feather over Auschwitz visitors In another, an impoverished Polish peasant listens to Radio Maryja These anecdotes are meant to give us enough ammo to conclude who our protagonists and antagonists are With the sketchiest of information, we presume to gain the authority to elevate the healer as a good guy, and condemn the old woman Crooked Mirror s literary style is basic, its discipline absent, its arrogance depressing Steinman s tic is putting two parts of speech at the end of sentences and separating them with a comma The Jews she knew hated Poland than Germany, a fact I never questioned as odd, misplaced Or, why would you expe...


  2. says:

    3.5 I love books in which before I even finish reading the introduction I have already learned something I did not know I had never heard of the Kielce Pogrom that took place in 1946, which convinced those that survived the camps, to flee Poland.The author sets out to attend an international Witness retreat at Auschwitz and this starts her quest to trace her Polish Jewish past She goes to Wannsee where the 1942 conference on the final solution took place and continues on to many other places trying to figure out the present day understanding between Poles and Jews.Part memoir, part historical, it is a book from which I learned much Would have rated it a solid 4 except, I foun...


  3. says:

    In graceful and heartfelt prose, Louise Steinman captures a horrific topic the results and residue of the Holocaust in Poland Thanks to my reader friend with whom I formed the World s Smallest Reading Group just the two of us , I learned about and read The Crooked Mirror.Louise Steinman, daughter of Polish Jewish immigrants, had lived all her life without learning a thing about her family s past Her mother could not even say the word Poland and Louise was only told that the country allowed almost all of Poland s Jews to be exterminated and possibly was even complicit in the genocide.I immediately sympathized with her dilemma One of the reasons I decided to write my own autobiography was because my parents rarely talked about their ancestors, nor as it turned out did they know much about them All my ancestors were German immigrants who came to the United States in the mid to late 1800s Two world wars with Germany as America s enemy had effectively silenced my grandparents about their origins In their efforts to assimilate and blend in, ne...


  4. says:

    Louise writes about the Poland that exists in American Jewish consciousness, and connects this perception to the Poland of today As a Jewish woman growing up in California and the daughter or Polish Jewish immigrants who arrived in the US before the war, she had always been taught that Poland is a land of anti Semites and collaborators Bitterness calcified, and in my home and among my generation of comfortable suburban Los Angeles Jewish kids, the very idea of Poland resonated anguish and betrayal in a way it did not for other Americans So it comes as a shock to her that her rabbi, Rabbi Singer, sends her to visit Poland to engage in a Polish Jewish reconciliation After all, if Poland is a country of anti Semites how can it be, or ever have been, a homeland for Jewish people It is extremely satisfying to travel this mind and history together Louise s feelings about her friends, family and community bring passion to history, something historians as a whole often can not do when writing purportedly objective accounts Because this is also a comprehensive introduction to Polish histo...


  5. says:

    This book has revealed a lot to me My Paternal family is all Polish, both of my Dad s parents and grand parents being 100% It s true that although I have heard a few stories about them, and their struggles growing up and being successful in America after immigrating here I ve never heard a single story about Poland or any family history before America It s been as if the family didn t start until they moved here I can t say for certain that this is because of the shame guilt associated with Poland that s described in this memoir, but it did make me wonder My family is all Catholic so far as I know , and primarily soft spoken and introverted As I was reading about Ms Steinman s experiences, I sort of linked that up with the devastating existence she describes here I imagine years of living in those times changed everyone, not just the Jewish population.For anyone reading that might not have Polish or Jewis...


  6. says:

    First, I must note that Louise Steinman has been a dear friend for many years While this has probably colored my opinion of this book, what she has written is heartfelt, thoroughly researched and beautifully written Without my having much prior knowledge of the plight of Polish Jews, this book brought to mind so many incidents of how people are treated wrongly and how this treatment is ignored We can reflect on ...


  7. says:

    This book, by an American Jew who visited Poland to visit the homes of her ancestors, discusses her travels through Poland and Ukraine, as well as some of the people she met there.The first half of the book, discussing the author s personal memories, was less interesting to me than the second half, which is focused on conversations with Poles who explain the common Polish desire to memorialize Poland s Jewish heritage by repairing Jewish cemeteries and similar acts of benevolence One journalist explained that he grew up under Soviet dominated Communist Poland, which he viewed as fake He added The last time we had a genuine Poland was the interwar republic before the Nazi invasion And it was the Poland of the Jews In the paradox of Polish nationalism, a Jewish presence is what makes Poland genuine One especially unusual manifestation of Polish philo Semitism is the Purim play in the small town of Tykocin, performed ...


  8. says:

    XXX I received this book as a give away from the publisher Thank you Louise Steinman wrote this memoir of Polish Jewish Reconciliation from her own struggle as the descendant of a participant in the atrocities lived through in Poland before and during the Second World War On the face of it, this seems simple In reality, doing a successful reconciliation is anything but simple, and Louise Steinman outlines the proper steps to make this horrendous mend in the fabric of Polish life as seamlessly as possible We southerners, and those of us in the melting pots of America, all the rival feuds instilled over the years from misunderstandings or misinformation or just basic life vision, be it accurate or read through a crooked mirror, need to approach our differences in the way outlined in this insightful record of a true melding of hearts and understanding It is possible to apologize and explain, to mourn and live again as neighbors and friends I find that very encou...


  9. says:

    Read my full review opinion Let me preface my review in saying that I love unique reads Ms Steinman has delivered this While I think this book was part memoir, I feel that it could also be considered a history current events book.While the story was fascinating, I felt that the writing was disconnected It almost had the feeling of someone, instead of being part of the story, was writing it from the outside looking in It truly lacked the emotional aspect that given the topic, I felt it should have had I felt that if there had been an inkling of emotion to the aweness of this story, this, hands down, would have been a 5 star ...


  10. says:

    Disclosure I won a copy of this book as part of a Goodreads giveaway I wasn t required to review the book, but prefer to do so.Beautiful book by a woman who decided that her family s past wasn t past Louise Steinman overcame her family s hatred of Poland by finding out what modern Poles thought about the Holocaust, in which most of Steinman s ancestors died With the help of dozens of family members, fellow travelers, Poles speaking for the dead, and Jewish people searching for resolution, she explores the complex and difficult relationship that her Jewish forebears...

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